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. the american-led bombing of libya. and the nuclear crisis in japan. one major question about the assault on libya, what happened to the media's skepticism? u.s. war planes hitting targets in libya for a second day today and i have to say this at the outset. the media get excited by war, the journalistic insulin starts pumping as we talk about cruise missiles and put up the maps and have retired generals on and sometimes something is lost, reminds me of eight years ago when shock and awe was reigned down upon baghdad and the media failed to ask questions. i looked at my "new york times" this morning and looked at my "washington post" and didn't see any editorials about the no-fly position. to newspapers don't see the excepty cal questions. what are if they are american casualties? do you stop this operation with gadhafi still in power? these are the questions we need to be asking. to help us answer them. rome hartman, former executive producer of the cbs news. and jamie mcentear, founder of the line of departure blog and former correspondent for cnn. where are the skeptical questions? >>
the damage. >>> first, disaster in japan, how do correspondents cover death and destruction on a massive sale? how does social media track and humanize such a story? i'm howard kurtz. this is "reliable sources." we have all been watching the horrifying pictures, trying to grasp the magnitude of what has happened in japan. journalists have done their best to report on the damage from friday's earthquake and tsunami, talk to the victims, evaluate the risks from that explosion at a nuclear plant and serious malfunction of a second plan, but whether they are operating on television, in print or online, the challenge is daunting. >> 126 million people watched their world crumble around them. 8.9, one of the biggest ever. and then the tsunami racing at the speed of a jumbo jet. >> as you know by now, the nation of japan has suffered a colossal historic earthquake that caused massive damage, massive loss of life and sent ocean waters racing over land. >> joining us to examine coverage from hong kong, mike chanoi of the u.s. china institute. and callie crosley, former abc producer who host as a show
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